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Beyond Mindfulness... The True Nature of Generosity and the Power of Compassion

Description

Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic of UPMC

Department of Psychiatry

Mental Health Conference Planning

Center for Integrative Medicine at UPMC Shadyside

The Center for Mindfulness and Consciousness Studies

University of Pittsburgh

Community Care Behavioral Health Organization

 

Registration for this course has closed, however walk-ins are welcome or you can contact Nancy Mundy at [email protected] until noon on Friday, 11/9/17. Payment for walk-ins is by check only.

  

Beyond Mindfulness…

The True Nature of Generosity and the Power of Compassion  

with

Tempe Dukte Lama

(MD20)

Saturday, November 11, 2017

 

Thomas E. Starzl Biomedical Science Tower South

Room S100

University of Pittsburgh

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

8:00 AM to 5:15 PM

 

Course Directors:

Jack Cahalane, PhD

Ronald Glick, MD

Jon Spiegel, PhD 

 

Recovery and Wellness:  The Journey Starts Here

A Joint Effort Sponsored by

Community Care Behavioral Health Organization and

Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic of UPMC
 

Introduction 

The past 20 years have seen a phenomenal growth in the use of mindfulness techniques in the clinical arena.   Mindfulness has proven to be useful in treating a wide variety of ills including; anxiety, chronic pain, addiction, eating disorders, PTSD and depression.  However, the way mindfulness is generally taught, it has a very limited scope.   Clinical Mindfulness is often void of its original meaning, cultural and religious foundation.  In the clinical context, the ethical foundation and existential focus of mindfulness have been lost.  The purpose of this Beyond Mindfulness conference is to expand the scope of mindfulness.

Participants will learn about the cultural, historical, and philosophical roots of these practices as well as the vast treasures expanded practice can reveal.  For thousands of years, the Tibetan spiritual traditions have cultivated meditative practices to strengthen the qualities of compassion and generosity. This conference will explore ways in which we can develop personally and support our clinical work through practices based in compassion and generosity. In the Tibetan Bon tradition, generosity is the first step toward developing a compassionate presence essential to a good life and an effective clinical practice.   

Educational Objectives

At the completion of this program, participants should be able to:
1. Describe the applicability of Bon psychological concepts and practices in the context of clinical work.
2. Describe and perform meditative practices that aid in the development of compassion and generosity and support psychological well-being.
3. Describe cultural, religious & ethical foundations of mindfulness 
4. Explain why generosity of heart, mind and action is the first step on the path of a compassionate being. 
5. Explain how to use mindfulness and generosity to abide in the true nature of mind.
6. Describe psychological and biological pathways leading from mindfulness practice to physical and mental health outcomes.
7. Explain how acceptance training uniquely changes one’s perspective in ways that reduce stress and generate positive emotions.

Who Should Attend:

Mental health professionals, community, clergy, patients, and family members.

 

Course Directors:

Jack Cahalane, PhD, MPH

Chief, Adult Mood and Anxiety Services

Director, Telepsychiatry

Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic of UPMC

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Ronald Glick, MD
Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine
Medical Director of the Center for Integrative Medicine
UPMC Shadyside

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Jon Spiegel, PhD
Clinical Assistant Professor of Psychiatry
University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

 

Keynote Speaker

Tempa Dukte Lama

Ordained Tibetan Bon Lama

Founder and Spiritual Director

Olmo Ling Bon Center and Institute

Pittsburgh, PA

 

Faculty

Emily Lindsay, Ph.D.

Postdoctoral Scholar
Department of Psychology
University of Pittsburgh


Leah Corinne Northrop, MS, RYT

Co-Director, Center for Mindfulness and Consciousness Studies

University of Pittsburgh
Yoga and Mindfulness Teacher, Falk Laboratory School
School of Education
University of Pittsburgh

All individuals in a position to control the content of this education activity are required to disclose all relevant financial relationships with any proprietary entity producing, marketing, re-selling, or distributing health care goods or services, used on, or consumed by, patients.


The University of Pittsburgh is an affirmative action, equal opportunity institution. 

Tempa Dukte Lama

Ordained Tibetan Bon Lama

Founder and Spiritual Director

Olmo Ling Bon Center and Institute

Pittsburgh, PA

 

Tempa Dukte Lama is an ordained Lama in the Tibetan Bon tradition. Bon is one of the five main spiritual schools of Tibet. Tempa Lama is the founder and spiritual director of Olmo Ling Bon Center and Institute in Pittsburgh, PA. Olmo Ling is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization dedicated to preserving the wisdom teachings of the ancient Tibetan Bon tradition and making these teachings available in the West. Tempa Lama is an artist, poet, and author of The Intimate Mind (2011), Inexhaustible Miracles (2011), Journey into Buddhahood (2013), and Heart Drop of the Loving Mother (2014). He is also co-founder of Humla Fund, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit dedicated to strengthening the native Bon culture and traditions in the Humla region of Himalayan Nepal through access to quality education, healthcare and sustainable economic development. 

Tempa Lama studied Tibetan Bon teachings, philosophy, meditation practices and rituals at Menri Monastery, India, from the age of six under the close guidance of His Holiness 33rd Menri Trizin, the spiritual head of the Bon tradition. In 2000, Tempa Lama accepted an invitation from Joan Halifax Roshi, the abbot of Upaya Zen Center in Santa Fe, New Mexico to live and teach at Upaya for five years. There he assisted in facilitating Upaya’s Project on Being with Dying, served for several years as Director of Upaya temple, and taught on topics including death and dying, meditation, Bon contemplative practices and Buddhist view and philosophy.

Tempa Lama teaches in the US, Canada, Mexico, and Europe, helping people bring a practice of compassion, healing, and happiness into their lives. Tempa Lama has been teaching continuing education workshops in Pittsburgh since 2009, focusing on support for the dying and the application of Bon teachings in clinical practice. He is the first Bon teacher to offer Bon teachings on being with dying to Western students. Central areas of his work include translations and commentaries on Bon teachings and practices, and the creation of educational programs geared toward the needs of psychologists and medical professionals in the areas of healing, compassionate care and spiritual support for the dying.

 

Abstract (first lecture):

“The True Nature of Generosity and the Power of Compassion”                               

In this lecture Tempa Lama will explain how cultivating the quality of generosity can help us open our heart and mind and connect with others. For thousands of years, the Tibetan spiritual traditions have cultivated meditative practices to strengthen the qualities of compassion and generosity. In the Tibetan Bon tradition, generosity is the first of the six awakened qualities cultivated on the path of compassion. Generosity is the key to openness of heart and mind. Based on openness, we can connect more deeply with others and with our own state of being. This quality of connection helps us manifest our aspiration into action.

 

Learning Objectives:

At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:

1. Articulate the role of generosity for personal transformation and our relationships with others

2. Explain how generosity can transform negative states of mind such as craving

3. Describe how self-compassion and compassion for others can support wellbeing

 

Abstract (second lecture):

“Mindfulness and the Nature of the Mind”

In this lecture Tempa Lama will explain how the practice of mindfulness can help build mental and psychological clarity and stability. Mindfulness is the quality of mind that rests with its chosen object or activity without distraction. The Tibetan traditions recognize mindfulness as the key to realize the state of our mind and the mind’s original nature, which is pure and undisturbed by afflicted emotions and thoughts. Mindfulness relies on the qualities of equanimity, stability, and continuity. Equanimity is the all-pervasive mind that keeps everything in its awareness and rests with each situation as it is, without modifying it. Cultivating this state of mind enables us to become deeply familiar with the functioning of our mind, and to recognize and let go of difficult emotions including anger, stress, anxiety, self-judgment, and depression.    

  

Learning Objectives:

At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:

1. Articulate how distraction affects the mind and cause stress

2. Describe the benefits of mindfulness for mental stability

3. Explain how mindfulness can help build mental and psychological clarity


References:

1. Khoury, B., Lecomte, N., Fortin, G., Masse, M., Therien, P., Bouchard, V., Chapleau, M.-A., Paquin, K., Hoffmann, S.G. (2013). Mindfulness-based therapy: a comprehensive meta-analysis. Clinical Psychology Review, 33(6), 763-771.
2. Neff, K., Germer, C.K. (2012). A pilot-study and randomized controlled trial of the mindful self-compassion program. Clinical Psychology, 69(1), 28-44.
3. Hoffmann, S.G., Grossman, P., Hinton, D.E. (2011). Loving-kindness and compassion meditation: potential for psychological interventions. Clinical Psychology Review, 31(7), 1126-1132.

Jack Cahalane, PhD, MPH

Chief, Adult Mood and Anxiety Services

Clinical Assistant Professor of Psychiatry

Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic

UPMC Health System

 

Dr. Cahalane is the Chief of General Adult Service line, Director of the Telemedicine, Forensic Psychiatry Program, Behavioral Health and Oncology Program and Clinical Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center.  He has primary responsibility for the programs providing inpatient and outpatient programs specializing in the treatment of mood and anxiety disorders as well as the Psychiatric Consultation Liaison Services for UPMC system hospitals, Center for Integrative Medicine. 

 

He received a BS from St. Francis College, an MSW from Catholic University of America and an MPH and PhD from the University of Pittsburgh.  He has co-authored a manual on coping with mental illness for families, co-authored a chapter in The Handbook of Marital Therapy and has co-authored numerous journal articles on cognitive therapy.

 

Ronald Glick, MD
Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine
Medical Director of the Center for Integrative Medicine
UPMC Shadyside

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

 

Dr. Glick has been affiliated with the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine for over 30 years, initially in training in psychiatry through WPIC, through a 2nd residency in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation with a focus on pain management, and through faculty appointments in the Departments of Psychiatry and Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. He has served as the Medical Director of the Center for Integrative Medicine for the last 15 years and is an Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. His clinical practice centers on integrative management of chronic pain and mental health conditions. He is active in medical student and resident education and has served as PI and co-investigator on over a dozen studies of integrative approaches.

 

Abstract:

"Listening Deeply to Connect with Individuals with Treatment Resistant Problems"

Experienced clinicians in mental health and medicine find themselves seeing clients/patients who experience conditions which are severe, chronic, and disabling. Often, the conditions defy diagnosis or the usual treatments have been ineffective or not tolerated. As with those who have experienced life traumas, these individuals have commonly had negative and frustrating encounters with health professionals, which impact on further interactions. This discussion will identify approaches that the professional can take to engage this person in a way to facilitate more positive interactions and lay the groundwork for change.

 

At the completion of this presentation, participants should be able to: 

  1. Identify common health concerns and patterns seen with individuals with treatment resistant conditions.

  2. Become comfortable with several approaches to help engage individuals with treatment resistance and set the stage for change or improvement.

  3. Engage individuals in a productive discussion regarding lifestyle-oriented approaches, including diet, exercise, mind-body practice, and avoidance of toxic substances.

References

 

1. Charon R; Hermann N; Devlin MJ. Close Reading and Creative Writing in Clinical Education: Teaching Attention, Representation, and Affiliation. Academic Medicine. 91(3):345-50, 2016 Mar.
2. Jeffrey D. Empathy, sympathy and compassion in healthcare: Is there a problem? Is there a difference? Does it matter?. Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. 109(12):446-452, 2016 Dec.
3. Greco CM; Yu L; Johnston KL; Dodds NE; Morone NE; Glick RM; Schneider MJ; Klem ML; McFarland CE; Lawrence S; Colditz J; Maihoefer CC; Jonas WB; Ryan ND; Pilkonis PA. Measuring nonspecific factors in treatment: item banks that assess the healthcare experience and attitudes from the patient's perspective. Quality of Life Research. 25(7):1625-34, 2016 07.
4. Gaufberg E; Hodges B. Humanism, compassion and the call to caring. Medical Education. 50(3):264-6, 2016 Mar.
5. Weir JM; Aicken MD; Cupples ME; Steele K. From Hippocrates to the Francis Report--Reflections on empathy. Ulster Medical Journal. 84(1):8-12, 2015 Jan.

 

Jon Spiegel, PhD

Clinical Assistant Professor of Psychiatry

University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

 

Jon Spiegel, PhD is a licensed psychologist in private practice since 1976. He is the Clinical Director of Spiegel/Freedman Psychological Associates. Dr. Spiegel has been teaching and supervising psychotherapist for the past 30 years. Since early adulthood he has been a dedicated student of religion and culture. His post-doctoral work was in mythology and comparative religion. He is the co-founder of the Program in Spirituality and Psychology at the Pittsburgh Theological Seminary. Dr. Spiegel is a Clinical Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine.

 

Abstract

The past 20 years have seen a phenomenal growth in the use of mindfulness techniques in the clinical arena.   Mindfulness has proven to be useful in treating a wide variety of ills including; anxiety, chronic pain, addiction, eating disorders, PTSD and depression.  However, the way mindfulness is generally taught, it has a very limited scope.   Clinical Mindfulness is often void of its original meaning, cultural and religious foundation.  In the clinical context, the ethical foundation and existential focus of mindfulness have been lost.  The purpose of this talk is to expand the scope of mindfulness.  Participants will learn about the cultural, historical, and philosophical roots of these practices as well as the vast treasures expanded practice can reveal.

 

Learning Objectives

At the completion of this presentation, participants should be able to:

1. Describe the applicability of Bon psychological concepts and practices in the context of clinical work.
2. Describe cultural, religious & ethical foundations of mindfulness
3. Explain the ethical implications of removing mindfulness from its religious context. 

References

  1. Brenda S. Cole Clare M. Hopkins Jon Spiegel John Tisak Sanjiv Agarwala John M. Kirkwood (2011). Mental Health, Religion & Culture: Published Online: Publication details, including instructions for authors and subscription information: http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/cmhr20. A randomized clinical trial of the effects of spiritually focused meditation for people with metastatic melanoma. 
  2. Williams, J. M. G., & Kabat-Zinn, J. (2011). Mindfulness: Diverse Perspectives on Its Meaning, Origins, And Multiple Applications at the Intersection of Science and Dharma. Contemporary Buddhism12(01), 1-18.
  3. Kabat-Zinn, J. (2011). Some reflections on the origins of MBSR, skillful means, and the trouble with maps. Contemporary Buddhism12(01), 281-306.
  4. Bodhi, B. (2011). What Does Mindfulness Really Mean? A Canonical Perspective. Contemporary Buddhism12(01), 19-39.
  5. Dunne, J. (2011). Toward an Understanding of Non-Dual Mindfulness. Contemporary Buddhism12(01), 71-88.

Emily Lindsay, Ph.D.

Postdoctoral Scholar

Department of Psychology

University of Pittsburgh

 

Emily Lindsay is a Postdoctoral Scholar in the Department of Psychology at University of Pittsburgh. She recently completed her PhD in health psychology at Carnegie Mellon University. She is broadly interested in psychosocial and biological pathways that link mental and physical health processes. In her current research, she is testing the active ingredients of mindfulness meditation training that impact emotion, stress, and physical health outcomes.

 

Abstract:

In the past 15 years, scientific research on mindfulness meditation has dramatically increased. This practice of monitoring the present moment with an orientation of acceptance can impact a wide range of cognitive, emotional, stress-related, and health outcomes. This talk will first describe how mindfulness “gets under the skin” to improve physical health by changing one’s subjective and biological responses to stress. Second, the talk will draw from recent research that highlights the key role of acceptance and equanimity in reducing biological stress reactivity and in generating positive emotions like gratitude, happiness, and contentment.

 

Learning Objectives

1. Describe how stress and positive emotions can impact physical health.

2. Describe psychological and biological pathways leading from mindfulness practice to physical and emotional health outcomes.

3. Explain how acceptance training uniquely changes one’s perspective in ways that reduce stress and generate positive emotions.

 

References:
1. Creswell, J.D. & Lindsay, E.K. (2014). How does mindfulness training affect health? A mindfulness stress buffering account. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 23(6), 401-407.
2. Lindsay, E.K. & Creswell, J.D. (2017). Mechanisms of mindfulness training: Monitor and Acceptance Theory (MAT). Clinical Psychology Review, 51, 47-59.
3. Creswell, J.D., Pacilio, L.E., Lindsay, E.K., & Brown, K.W. (2014). Brief Mindfulness Meditation Training Alters Psychological and Neuroendocrine Responses to Social Evaluative Stress. Psychoneuroendocrinology, 44, 1-12

Leah Corinne Northrop, MS, RYT

Co-Director, Center for Mindfulness and Consciousness Studies

University of Pittsburgh

Yoga and Mindfulness Teacher, Falk Laboratory School

School of Education

University of Pittsburgh

 

Leah Northrop, MS, RYT, is a faculty member at the University of Pittsburgh’s Falk Laboratory School where she teaches yoga and mindfulness.  Her focus is on mindful awareness practices for students, teachers and administrators in an educational setting.  Additionally, Ms. Northrop is Co-Director of the University of Pittsburgh’s Center for Mindfulness and Consciousness Studies (CMCS).  CMCS aims to promote research, education and service related to mindfulness and consciousness studies.   

 

Abstract

This session will include a brief introduction to Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) and two short experiences with practices based in MBSR.  First, participants will explore awareness through three modes: listening, feeling and breathing.  Second, participants will explore awareness through a body scan, a brief body-awareness activity that moves attention throughout the body. 

 

Learning Objectives

By the completion of this session, participants should be able to:

1. Describe the aims of Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction.

2. Describe their experience with exploring awareness with senses and in body awareness.

3. Build familiarity with mindful awareness practices.


References
1. Bohlmeijer, E. et al. (2010). Meta Analysis of MBSR and Chronic Illness. Journal of Psychosomatic Research. 68, 539–544
2. Goyal M. (2014). Meditation programs for psychological stress and well-being: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Journal of American Medical Association Internal Medicine. 174(3), 357-68.


Schedule

8:00 to 9:00 a.m.            Registration/Continental Breakfast

8:30 to 9:00 a.m.            Tai Chi

Ron Glick, MD
         

9:00 to 9:30 a.m.            Welcome, Introductions and Background
Jack Calahane

9:30 to 10:30 a.m.          "The True Nature of Generosity and the 

Power of Compassion"     

Tempa Dukte Lama

                                                      
10:30 to 10:45 a.m.            Break

 

10:45 to 11:45 a.m.          "Cultural, Religious and Ethical Foundation of Mindfulness" 
Jon Spiegel, PhD

11:45 a.m.to 1:00 p.m.        Lunch


1:00 to 2:00 p.m.                “Mindfulness Meditation Reduces

Stress and Generates Positive Emotions…The Key Role of Acceptance

Training”

Emily Lindsay, Ph.D.

                                            Guided Meditation
Leah Corrine Northrup, MS

2:00 to 3:00                        "Listening Deeply to Connect with Individuals with Treatment Resistant Problems"
Ron Glick, MD

3:00 to 3:15 p.m.                Break

3:15 to 4:15 p.m.               "Mindfulness and the Nature of the Mind" 

Tempa Dukte Lama

4:15 to 5:15 p.m.                Panel: "Beyond Mindfulness"

Tempa Dukte Lama
Leah Corrine Northrup
Emily Lindsay
Jon Spiegel
     

5:15 p.m.                            Adjournment

 

Continuing Education Credit

Continuing Medical Education (CME) credits are NOT available for this conference.

 

Psychologists

Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic is approved by the American Psychological Association to offer continuing education for psychologists. Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic maintains responsibility for this program and its content. This program is being offered for 6.5 continuing education credits.

 

Counselors

Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic has been approved by NBCC as an Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP No. 5059.  Programs that do not qualify for NBCC credit are clearly identified.  Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic is solely responsible for all aspects of this program.  This program is being offered for 6.5 continuing education hours. 

 

Certified Alcohol and Drug Counselors/Certified Co-Occurring Disorders Professionals: CADC/CCDP

The Office of Education and Regional Programming, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic is certified by the Pennsylvania Certification Board (PCB) to provide Certified Alcohol and Drug Counselor (CADC) and Certified Co-occurring Disorders Professional (CCDP) continuing education credits. This program is being offered for 6.5 continuing education credits.

 

Licensed/Clinical Social Workers, Licensed Professional Counselors, Licensed Marriage and Family Therapists: LSW/LCSW/LPC/LMFT

This program is offered for 6.5 hours of social work continuing education through co-sponsorship of the University of Pittsburgh’s School of Social Work, a Council on Social Work Education-accredited school and, therefore, a PA pre-approved provider of social work continuing education. These credit hours satisfy requirements for LSW/LCSW, LPC and LMFT biennial license renewal. For information on social work continuing education call (412) 624-3711.

 

Other Healthcare Professionals

Nurses and other health care professionals are awarded 0.65 Continuing Education Units (CEU's). One CEU is equal to 10 contact hours. Nurses: For attending this program you will receive a Certificate of Attendance confirming 6.5 hours of continuing education. These hours may be considered eligible for completing the 30 hours of continuing education required for biannual nursing re-licensure in Pennsylvania. Peer Specialists: This program fulfills requirements for Certified Peer Specialist continuing education.

Location:

Thomas E. Starzl Biomedical Science Tower South

Room S120

University of Pittsburgh

200 Lothrop Street

Pittsburgh, PA 15213

 

Directions:

Thomas E. Starzl Biomedical Science Tower South

200 Lothrop St., Pittsburgh, PA 15213

 

Via the PA Turnpike and Interstate 376: Take exit 57, Pittsburgh/Monroeville, to Interstate 376 West. Follow the interstate to Exit 7A, Oakland (Bates Street). Follow Bates Street to the first stoplight. Take a left onto the Boulevard of the Allies. At the first stoplight, take a right onto Halket Street. Follow Halket to the next stoplight, and take a right on to Forbes Avenue. Follow Forbes to Atwood Street; turn left onto Atwood. Follow Atwood to the next stoplight (Fifth Ave.) and turn left, then immediately get into the far right lane. Turn right onto Lothrop Street. Near the top of the hill there are signs for Presbyterian Hospital Garage on the left. This garage is open for public use. Take the elevators to level “D.” The elevators will open into the Biomedical Science Tower Lobby and the room is off the lobby.

 

Via Interstates 79/279 from the North: Take Interstate 79 south to Interstate 279 south (two miles south of Wexford/Route 910). Near downtown, take exit 8A to Interstate 579, and follow signs to Interstate 376 east via the Boulevard of the Allies. Take Forbes Avenue/Oakland exit left; do not continue on Interstate 376 east. Bear right onto the Forbes Avenue access ramp, and follow Forbes to Atwood Street; turn left onto Atwood Street. Follow Atwood to the next stoplight (Fifth Ave.) and turn left, then immediately get into the far right lane. Turn right onto Lothrop Street. Near the top of the hill there are signs for Presby Garage on the left. This garage is open for public use. Take the elevators to level “D.” The elevators will open into the Biomedical Science Tower Lobby and the room is off the lobby.

 

Via Interstates 79/279 from the South: Take Interstate 79 north to Exit 59A. Take Interstate 279 North, following signs to Interstate 376 east. Take 376 east and exit at Forbes Avenue/Oakland (Exit 5). Follow Forbes to Atwood Street. Turn left onto Atwood Street. Follow Atwood to the next stoplight (Fifth Ave.) and turn left, then immediately get into the far right lane. Turn right onto Lothrop Street. Near the top of the hill there are signs for Presby Garage on the left. This garage is open for public use. Take the elevators to level “D.” The elevators will open into the Biomedical Science Tower Lobby and the room is off the lobby.

 

Registration Information

Fee Schedule

                                            Before 10/27/17                    After 10/27/17

 

Professionals                                $120                                      $140                                                                                                                        

UPMC Affiliated Professionals      $100                                      $120

Online registration: Please use discount code: mindfulness.employ and click on Apply to Total

 

Medical Residents/Students/Interns/Community Members

(no continuing

education)                                     $50                                        $70

Online registration: Please use discount code: mindfulness.student and click on Apply to Total

 

Tuition includes:

* All registration and conference materials

* Continental breakfast, refreshments and lunch

* Continuing education credits at the professional level only

 

Instructions for registering online:

1. Click on ‘Register Now’ (small box at bottom of page)

2.  If "Beyond Mindfulness... The True Nature of Generosity and the Power of Compassion" appears under ‘Shopping Cart’, click on ‘Checkout’ (think of this as ‘continue’).
3.  Register as a new registrant, or sign in if you already have an account
(username is your e-mail).
4.  When the conference name appears again, click on ‘Checkout’ (again,
think of this as ‘continue’)
5.  Continuing Education Credit – Please use dropdown list for credential
or choose Not Applicable (you must complete this). Click on ‘continue’.
6.  Enter your promotional code if applicable
(please see above). Click on ‘Apply to Total’!

7.  Add credit card information if applicable, and click on ‘Process
Payment’.
8.  Complete Transaction and print your receipt.

 

Only credit card payments can be made online.

Please send your check (payable to OERP/WPIC) or UPMC Account Transfer information with the registration form that can be obtained at http://www.yftipa.org/pages/wpic-oerp-western-psychiatric-institute-and-clinic-office-of-educational-resources-and-planning. Please return completed form and payment to Nancy Mundy at [email protected] or fax it to 412.204.9110. You can also mail the form and payment to Nancy at:

OERP/WPIC

Champion Commons Building, Room 322

3811 O’Hara Street

Pittsburgh, PA  15213

 

Handicap Logo

 

We encourage participation by all individuals.  If you have a disability, advance notification of any special needs will help us better serve you.  Please notify us of your needs at least two weeks in advance of the program by calling Nancy Mundy at 412-204-9090.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 




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