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STAR-Center 2019 Conference

Description

UPMC Western Psychiatric Hospital
    Department of Psychiatry 
    Office of Educational Resources and Planning

Community Care Behavioral Health

 

Registration for this conference is closed. We will be taking walk-ins, so you can register when you arrive. Handouts will not be given at the event and WIFI will not be available.

To print the handouts or move them to your tablet/phone, please go to https://www.starcenter.pitt.edu/PRINT-HANDOUTS/51/default.aspx. 

 

2019 STAR-Center Conference

 

“Students, Sleep and Safety: Evidence=Based Approaches to Reducing Teen Suicide Risk"

(MD39)

 

Friday, May 10, 2019
8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
(Registration: 7:30 to 8:30 a.m.)

 

William Pitt Union
(University of Pittsburgh Campus)
3959 Fifth Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15260

 

Course Directors

David A. Brent, M.D., Director, STAR-Center

Paula McCommons, Ed.D. Director, STAR-Center Outreach

 

Recovery and Wellness: The Journey Starts Here
A Joint Effort Sponsored by Community Care Behavioral Health Organization and UPMC Western Psychiatric Hospital

 

Description

 

STAR-Center is a suicide prevention program for teens and young children within the UPMC Western Psychiatric Hospital, Department of Psychiatry. From its inception in 1986, the program has been primarily funded through an appropriation from the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania to the University of Pittsburgh.

 

STAR-Center is a program that combines clinical and outreach services designed to combat the problem of child and adolescent suicide. We provide outpatient assessment and treatment for depressed and anxious children and teens. We also offer acute treatment to depressed and suicidal teens via our Intensive Outpatient Program (IOP).

 

Our annual conferences strive to disseminate what we have learned about best practice clinical care into practical guidelines for educational and community settings. STAR Center is devoted to providing training opportunities for students and psychiatric residents as well as contributing to the future development of research designed to study the pressing issues related to child and adolescent suicide.

 

Course Objectives:

 

At the completion of this conference, participants should be able to:

  1. Describe research findings that support an association between sleep and suicidality in youth
  2. Recognize ways in which sleep disturbance may contribute to suicide risk in youth
  3. Discuss approaches to the assessment and treatment of sleep that may aid in identification and treatment of suicidal youth
  4. Identify evidence-informed strategies for preventing, identifying, and addressing depression in school settings
  5. Identify implementation challenges in addressing depression and suicide prevention in school settings
  6. Identify strategies to overcome implementation challenges

 

Target Audience
This program is appropriate for clinical and educational personnel.

 

“Students’ Sleep and Safety: Evidence-Based Approaches to Reducing Teen Suicide Risk”

 

Conference Agenda

 

May 10, 2019

The William Pitt Union

(University of Pittsburgh Campus)


7:30 A.M.         REGISTRATION

8:30 A.M.         OPENING REMARKS                                                         

9:00 A.M.         KEYNOTES

Improving Teen Sleep to Prevent Suicide: Promising Strategy or Impossible Dream?

Tina R. Goldstein, PhD, Associate Professor of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh, School of Medicine, and Associate Director, STAR-Center (Services for Teens at Risk), UPMC Western Psychiatric Hospital

 

 There will be a brief break between Keynotes

 

Overcoming Implementation Barriers in Addressing Depression and Suicidality in Schools

Mary Margaret Kerr, EdD, Professor, Administrative and Policy Studies, Psychology in Education, and Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh.

 

11:30 A.M.       LUNCH (On Your Own)

 

12:45 P.M.      SKILL DEVELOPMENT WORKSHOPS (See following pages)

 

2:00 P.M.          BREAK

 

2:15 P.M.          SKILL DEVELOPMENT WORKSHOPS – REPEAT

 

3:30 P.M.          ADJOURNMENT


STAR-Center is funded by an appropriation from the Pennsylvania General Assembly.  The University of Pittsburgh is an affirmative action, equal opportunity institution.

 

KEYNOTE ADDRESSES

 

Keynote Address:  Improving Teen Sleep to Prevent Suicide:  Promising Strategy or Impossible Dream?

Tina R. Goldstein, PhD Associate Professor of Child Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh, School of Medicine, and Associate Director, STAR-Center (Services for Teens at Risk), UPMC Western Psychiatric Hospital

This presentation will discuss common sleep difficulties among youth, and review studies that support an association between sleep and suicidality.  We will explore ways that sleep difficulties may affect suicide risk and describe sleep-related assessment and treatment approaches that may aid in identification and treatment of suicidal youth.

At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:

1. Describe research findings that support an association between sleep and suicidality in youth       

2. Recognize ways in which sleep disturbance may contribute to suicide risk in youth

3. Discuss approaches to the assessment and treatment of sleep that may aid in identification and treatment of suicidal youth.

--------------------

 

Keynote Address:  Overcoming Implementation Barriers in Addressing Depression and Suicidality in Schools

 

Mary Margaret Kerr, EdD, Professor, Administrative and Policy Studies, Psychology in Education, and Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh

This presentation offers a practical look at evidence-informed strategies for preventing, identifying, and addressing depression and suicidality in school settings.  Specifically, we review the a) specific implementation challenges associated with school mental health initiatives (universal, targeted, and intensive) and b) ways to avoid the obstacles in school-mental health interactions.

 

At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Identify evidence-informed strategies for preventing, identifying, and addressing depression in school settings
  2. Identify implementation challenges in addressing depression and suicide prevention in school settings
  3. Identify strategies to overcome implementation challenges

 

SKILL DEVELOPMENT WORKSHOPS

 

Please note when registering that participants will select two workshops and an alternate.  All workshops will repeat.  If space is not available in one of your selected workshops, you will be placed in your alternate.  


A. Workshop Title: Adjunctive Group Intervention for Depressed/Anxious Youth Transitioning to College (Intermediate)

• Kimberly Poling, LCSW, Clinical Program Manager, STAR-Center, UPMC Western Psychiatric Hospital

• Tina Goldstein, PhD, Associate Professor of Child Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh, School of Medicine, and Associate Director, STAR-Center, UPMC Western Psychiatric Hospital

•   Kim Jordan Simmons, PhD, Licensed Clinical Psychologist, Carnegie Mellon University, Counseling and Psychological Services



In this workshop, the presenters will describe an adjunct group intervention for depressed/anxious transition age youth and their parents. The group focuses on skills to build independence and optimize success in the transition to college.   

 
At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1. Discuss tools to recognize and plan for the multiple transitions young people with mental health issues face as they age into adulthood
2. Discuss the domains of independence relevant to the transition age patient
3. Describe the structure and content of the group-based intervention



B. Workshop Title: Prevention and Treatment of Depression and Suicidality among Gender Minority (Transgender and Nonbinary) Youth: An Introduction and Review of the Health Sciences Literature (Intermediate) 
        

• Michael Marshal, PhD, Psychologist, Center for Mental Health and Wellness, LLC

• Brian Thoma, PhD, Postdoctoral Scholar, University of Pittsburgh, UPMC Western Psychiatric Hospital


This workshop will provide clinicians with: (1) an introduction to gender minority identities among teenagers, (2) an overview of the research literature describing depression and suicidality among gender minority adolescents, (3) an overview of the mental health treatment literature specific to serving gender minority adolescent patients, and (4) information regarding the key factors that affect teenagers experiences and interactions with schools and school personnel during the coming out and social transition process, and (5) an in-depth discussion of gender dysphoria and how to incorporate our understanding of this concept in the mental health care of gender minority youth.

At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1. Describe and define what it means to have a gender minority identity
2. Discuss the status of the health sciences literature focused on depression and suicidality disparities among gender minority youth
3. Describe and define “gender dysphoria” and incorporate this knowledge into their case conceptualizations when working with gender minority adolescent patients.



C. Workshop Title: Trauma-Focused CBT for Traumatized LGBTQ Youth (Intermediate)

Judith Cohen, MD, Professor of Psychiatry, Medical Director, AGH Center for Traumatic Stress in Children and Adolescents, Allegheny Health Network 


Lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) youth are at heightened risk for experiencing trauma and related mental health problems. This presentation describes clinical applications of Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT) for LGBTQ youth developed during a National Child Traumatic Stress Network learning community, and preliminary treatment outcome findings utilizing these applications.

At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1. Describe three types of traumas that LGBT youth are at greater risk for experiencing than their straight peers
2. Describe the 9 core TF-CBT PRACTICE components
3. Describe 3 modifications to the basic TF-CBT model for LGBT youth 



D. Workshop Title: Risk Assessment (Intermediate)

• Paula S. McCommons, EdD, Director, STAR-Center Outreach, UPMC Western Psychiatric Hospital

• Maria Anderson, Clinician, STAR-Center, UPMC Western Psychiatric Hospital


In this interactive workshop, we will review the key concepts and questions in conducting a suicide risk assessment with school age youth. Participants will learn various ways to “Ask the question” at different developmental ages and generate appropriate safety plans. Considerations for communicating safety concerns with parents and school staff will also be highlighted.

At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1. Identify the key questions to ask in a suicide risk assessment of school age youth.
2. Describe ways to modify how suicide risk is assessed at different developmental ages.
3. Discuss how to effectively communicate safety concerns and share safety plans with parents and school staff.


E. Workshop Title: Understanding and Supporting Mental Health Needs and Safety in the Schools (Intermediate)

• Brian McKain, RN, MSN, CNS, Clinician, STAR-Center, UPMC Western Psychiatric Hospital

• Sara Goodyear, MSEd, LPC, NCC, Clinician, STAR-Center, UPMC Western Psychiatric Hospital


Session focuses on how to provide support in coordination of care between school staff, mental health providers, & families to assist the individual student in 504/IEP meetings. Session will include resources & skills for understanding & assisting students with various mental health concerns. Focus will include concerns regarding assessing individual student safety.

At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1.    Identify basic student needs and appropriate level of accommodation
2. Identify effective communication in school meetings including communication skills that may be helpful 
3. Identify behaviors that may indicate additional needs for support and assess basic safety




F. Workshop Title: Why Mindfulness Matters . . . And How to Introduce it to Teens (Intermediate)

Danella Hafeman, MD, PhD, Assistant Professor, Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh


Mindfulness has become a hot topic in recent years. In this workshop, we will (1) provide an introduction to mindfulness; (2) discuss how mindfulness interventions might impact brain and emotions; and (3) introduce some practical exercises that can be used to integrate these concepts in various settings with adolescents. 

At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1. Define what mindfulness is (and what it is not)
2. Describe two mindfulness interventions, and how they might be applied in youth
3. Discuss mindfulness exercises that may be used in a variety of settings with teens



G. Targeting Insomnia as a Transdiagnostic Approach to Improving Mental Health: Brief Behavioral Treatment of Insomnia (BBTI) (Intermediate)

Peter L. Franzen, PhD, Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine


Poor sleep health is bi-directionally associated with poor emotional and physical health during adolescence and across the lifespan. Brief behavioral treatment of insomnia (BBTI), developed here at the University of Pittsburgh, is an evidenced-based intervention that can be applied broadly to both healthy and psychiatric populations to improve functioning.   

At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1. Discuss insomnia and short sleep as factors leading to depression and suicidality
2. Discuss what controls sleep: The homeostatic sleep drive and circadian rhythms, and how these change during adolescent development.
3. Explain Brief Treatment for Insomnia




H. Workshop Title: Little Kids, Big Problems – Anxiety and Depressive Disorders in Children (Intermediate)

• Dara Sakolsky, MD Assistant Professor of Psychology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine

• Laura J. Dietz, PhD, Associate Professor of Clinical Rehabilitation and Mental Health Counseling, University of Pittsburgh School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences


Anxiety disorders are some of the most common and early presenting types of psychiatric disorders that bring school-age children (ages 6-12) to outpatient mental health services. Despite evidencing impairment at important developmental periods, a significant number of anxious children are not diagnosed and do not receive effective treatment. Anxiety disorders also may precede and contribute to depressive disorders in children, including suicidality and self-injury. This course will describe the clinical presentation and effective treatments for children with anxiety and depressive disorders.

At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1. Describe the clinical presentation of anxiety and depressive disorders in children
2. Compare and contrast evidence-based psychotherapies for childhood anxiety and depressive disorders
3. Explain the risks, benefits, and potential side effects of evidence-based pharmacotherapy for childhood anxiety and depressive disorders


I. Workshop Title: Update on Adolescents, Social Media, and Mental Health: Understanding Risks, Benefits, and Applications for Clinical Practice. (Introductory)

• Ana Radovic, MD, MSc, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, Adolescent and Young Adult Medicine, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine

• Candice Biernesser, LCSW, MPH, PhD Candidate, Program Administrator, UPMC Western Psychiatric Hospital and Behavioral and Community Health Sciences, University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health


Today, social media use is nearly universal among teens. While maladaptive use of social media is associated with adverse mental health effects among youth, social media also offers adolescents important benefits. This presentation will offer practical guidance for discussing the mental health effects of social media use with adolescents.

At the completion of this session, participants should be able to:
1. Identify the leading risk and protective factors for adolescent depression, anxiety, and suicidal behavior that are associated with social media use
2. Discuss the perspectives of youth’s online experiences that contribute to feelings of support and distress
3. Discuss options to guide to vulnerable youth on how to take advantage of positive aspects of social media, while managing the negative aspects of use


All individuals in a position to control the content of this education activity are required to disclose all relevant financial relationships with any entity producing, marketing, re-selling, or distributing health care goods or services, used on, or consumed by, patients.

The University of Pittsburgh is an affirmative action, equal opportunity institution


Continuing Education Credits:
 
Psychologists:
UPMC Western Psychiatric Hospital is approved by the American Psychological Association to offer continuing education for psychologists. UPMC Western Psychiatric Hospital maintains responsibility for this program and its content. This program is being offered for 5.5 Continuing Education Credits.

Counselors:
UPMC Western Psychiatric Hospital has been approved by NBCC as an Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP No. 5059. Programs that do not qualify for NBCC credit are clearly identified. UPMC Western Psychiatric Hospital is solely responsible for all aspects of this program. This program is being offered for 5.5 continuing education hours. 

Licensed/Clinical Social Workers, Licensed Professional Counselors, Licensed Marriage and Family Therapists: LSW/LCSW/LPC/LMFT:
This program is offered for 5.5 hours of social work continuing education through co-sponsorship of the University of Pittsburgh School of Social Work, a Council on Social Work Education-accredited school and, therefore, a PA pre-approved provider of social work continuing education. These credit hours satisfy requirements for LSW/LCSW, LPC, and LMFT biennial license renewal. For information on social work continuing education, call 412-624-3711.

PA Educators (Act 48):
UPMC Western Psychiatric Hospital is recognized by the Pennsylvania Department of Education to offer Continuing Education Credits under the Act 48 guidelines. UPMC Western Psychiatric Hospital adheres to the Act 48 Continuing Education Guidelines. PA educators will receive 5.5 hours of Act 48 credit for completing this program.

Other Professionals:
Nurses and other professionals are awarded 0.55 Continuing Education Credits. One Continuing Education Credit is equal to 10 contact hours. Nurses: For attending this program, you will receive a Certificate of Attendance confirming 5.5 hours of continuing education. These hours may be considered eligible for completing the 30 hours of continuing education required for biannual nursing re-licensure in Pennsylvania. Peer Specialist: This program fulfills requirements for Certified Peer Specialist continuing education.


Registration Information

 

Cost:

 

*Registration Fee - $60  

 

$30 - UPMC WPSY/University of Pittsburgh Employee - Use code star2019.wpic-pitt if registering online. Please use your UPMC or University of Pittsburgh e-mail address.

 

*One name per registration, please.


The registration fee includes a light breakfast (coffee/tea/juices/muffins, etc.) and continuing
education credits.



PLEASE NOTE: Handouts will not be available at the conference. To print copies of the presentations, please to www.starcenter.pitt.edu.

 

Full tuition must accompany registration.  A $10 administration fee will be deducted from all refunds for cancellations.  All refund requests must be in writing and received in the office no later than Thursday, May 2, 2019.  There will be no refunds if a cancellation occurs on the date of the event.

 

Instructions for applying online:

 

  1. Click on ‘Register Now’ (small box at bottom of
    page)

  2. If “STAR-Center Conference” appears under
    ‘Shopping Cart’, click on ‘Checkout’ (think of this as ‘continue’).

  3. Register as a new registrant or sign in if you
    already have an account (username is your e-mail). You do not have to add in
    information about your insurance.

  4. When the conference name appears again, click on
    ‘Checkout’ (again, think of this as ‘continue’)

  5. Continuing Education Credit – Please use dropdown
    list for credential or choose Not Applicable/NA (you must complete this). Click on ‘continue’.

  6. Please answer all questions regarding workshop
    choices.

  7. Enter your promotional code if applicable (please
    see above). Click on ‘Apply to Total’!

  8. Add credit card information and click on ‘Process
    Payment’.

  9. Complete Transaction and print your receipt.

 


 

We encourage participation by all individuals.  If you have a disability or require special accommodations, advance notification of any special needs will help us better serve you.  Please notify us of your needs at least two weeks in advance of the program by calling Nancy Mundy at 412-204-9090




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